It was 2006 when we began preparations for the first Game Localization Round Table (GLRT). Localization World was already the leading industry event for software localization and tools but there was nothing anywhere about the localization of multimedia interactive entertainment software, ‘entertainment’ being the keyword here. There were very few dedicated companies catering to this growing sector within the language services industry. Professionals were mostly working in their silos and often in the dark about other parts of the process. So when I approached LW organizers about doing a session on game localization they welcomed it and asked me whether I would lead the initiative with their support. It was a resounding “Yes” from me. Though at the time there was some resistance because of the novelty, NDAs, etc., it was clear based on our conversations with peers that it would be an advantageous step for everybody involved: developers, publishers, and LSPs alike, for there to be a high-level dialogue amongst industry professionals. It has been a pleasure to see the success of our efforts in sharing both the best practices and innovations in game localization and QA.

Since then, the interactive entertainment industry has only continued to grow and all companies, departments, and professionals have had to adapt in order to keep up. Ourselves included. Because of this, we decided to expand the content of our events and created Game Global. Responding to market developments, covering QA, translation and LQA, tools, mobile, cloud workflows, glocalization, and everything in between.

To further the reach of our events, I have contributed my research and collaborated with industry professionals to both write peer-reviewed articles and edit journals of international standing. Now, game localization can be studied in universities because we have established academic scholarship, and I am happy to have been part of many groundbreaking dissertations and PhDs. New graduates can now readily enter the industry further accelerating changes that lead to improvements in professional practice. Our industry has fully matured.

Our first two-day Game Global Summit took place in Warsaw in June 2018 and was a big success. We had managed to create an event where publishers, developers, and service providers from the game localization industry were able to meet and exchange ideas with their peers in a relaxed and friendly environment. Europe has the HQs of all the leading companies in game development and publishing, localization, tools, functionality, and linguistic testing. The synergies of all of these professionals brought together is an incredibly enriching experience. Whether they become formal partners or not, everybody learns from each other and we all push the industry forward with better results for both the players’ and companies’ bottom lines.

Most of the top professionals from each of the leading companies around the world have contributed to our events, shaping them, and making sure that we stay at the forefront of new developments. Over the years we have seen presentations, round tables, and panels from Ubisoft, Blizzard, Electronic Arts, Square Enix, PlayStation, Disney, Sega, King, Microsoft, Travian, CCP, Crytek, and more. Many speakers and attendees have become fans of our event and come back every year not only because of the friendly environment but also because it is one of the very few places where they can share and grow professionally.

 

More than a decade later, we are thrilled to step into a whole new way of hosting Game Global as an online event with a compelling program thanks to the talented professionals who continually contribute to our success. We hope you enjoy the new format and make the most of the capabilities the online environment offers and we hope to see you soon at our next in-person Game Global Summit. 

About the Author
Miguel Bernal-Merino
Lecturer at Roehampton University

Miguel Bernal-Merino believes passionately in great quality game localization and has been working nonstop to raise awareness of issues within the game and localization industries as well as academia and translation studies. He is convinced that research into these topics will improve quality, player satisfaction, turnover, and return on investment. Miguel holds a doctorate in the localization of video games and is currently lecturing at the University of Roehampton in London. He is a sought-after speaker and prolific author on audiovisual translation and game localization. Miguel was instrumental in the creation of the Localization Summit within the Game Developers Conference and is one of the advisors. He is also a member of the International Game Developers Association and co-founder of the Game Localization Special Interest Group.